1. Keywords
Use as many relevant keywords as possible, the emphasis being on relevant. You want your designs to appear in the right searches. Customers won't thank you when they are searching for designs if the suggestions are full of irrelevant designs. 
Spoonflower recommends using up to 4 colour related keywords to highlight your design. 
2. CMYK or RGB
When I first began uploading designs to Spoonflower I didn't fully understand CMYK and RGB. I would upload a design and the colours would be different-it took me a while to figure out the problem. All designs are automatically converted to sRGB for printing and this conversion will result in some color difference if you use an alternate color space for creating your design. 
BONUS TIP
Designing in Adobe Illustrator or Photoshop? Spoonflower provides a downloadable map of the 171 available colour. Using spoonflowers colours from the start of a design is a timesaver. The colours print as expected so the test swatches are less likely to need adjustments before being ready for sale. Click the link below to go right to the download
3. Design Scale
Another thing to consider when you're creating a design file is that the higher the DPI resolution the better quality image you'll get (and a much larger file size). Screens have a resolution of 75dpi where as spoonflower printers have 150dpi. 
4. Reducing the Cost of Test Swatches
A test swatch is required before each design can be made available for sale. This is to check of the quality of the design and how the colours appear when printed.
8x8in (20x20cm) swatches cost £2 each, with postage added at checkout. If you're regularly adding designs to your shop the costs can quickly mount. Fill-a-yard (FAY) gives you the option to proof upto 48 designs at once, reducing the cost to around 80p per design
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Spoonflower hosts weekly design challenges, which are a great way of stretching your creative muscles and finding design inspiration. Although don't feel like you have to submit a design if the challenge topic doesn't fit your style. I did this initially, while I was still finding my style and my shop was a total mismash of design styles for a while.
For more design tips check out 
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